Rustic Meat Loaf with Potatoes

Loved the idea, but not all of the potatoes cooked all the way through…continue reading the blog to see my ideas for next time.

Loved the idea, but not all of the potatoes cooked all the way through…continue reading the blog to see my ideas for next time.

This first attempt didn’t come out perfect! Not all of the potatoes got cooked. I planned ahead and baked a russet and a couple of yams…just in case..so it all worked out. I have some ideas about how to be successful next time. I used russets, but Davie used Yukon Golds. Shelly suggested using yams. I will try that next time. That’s one on my favorite things about cooking is there is almost always room for improvement!

Cutting the dry bread into big cubes and big chunks of onion make this a rustic meatloaf.

Cutting the dry bread into big cubes and big chunks of onion make this a rustic meatloaf.

Meat Loaf is a comfort food and a perfect meal for a crispy Autumn day. I make my meat loaf in a rustic style. Big chunks of crust bread absorb the fat and taste so good! I chop the onion in large pieces so you can taste their sweetness next to the cooked beef.

I started cutting the onions is my recipes in large pieces when my grandchildren went through their picky phases. If the pieces were big enough it was easy for them to move to the side of their plates. It made for a quieter family meal when they didn’t have to search through their food looking for the things they didn’t like with me carping on them to try it you might like it.

Celery adds that crisp, mild, yet a slight salty bite. Celery is one of the foods that I always buy organic. It’s on the Environmental Working Group’s list of the Dirty Dozen a list of foods that are grown with a lot of pesticides. It’s important to me to be able to cook the best foods I can for myself and family.

Assemble the simple ingredients is usually the first step in preparing a meal.

Assemble the simple ingredients is usually the first step in preparing a meal.

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In the picture about you will see a vintage tin of dried mustard. That was only for the color in the image. I have some fresh dried mustard I used in the recipe. Using fresh herbs and spices will improve the flavors you want better than old herbs and spices. I grow sage, rosemary and oregano in my yard so I always have them at hand

Meatloaf and potato - 1st try

Meatloaf and potato - 1st try

Rustic Meat Loaf

ingredients

1 ½ lb ground beef - could be a mixture of meats or even turkey. I used lean ground beef.
2 eggs
2 cups bread – cubed
2 onions – chopped
½ cup minced celery
2 cloves garlic - minced or grated
2 tbsp ketchup
1 tsp dried mustard or 1 tbsp prepared yellow mustard
1/3 cup chopped parsley or 4 tbsp dried parsley
Salt & Pepper     

Directions

Mix all of the ingredients in a bowl. Put the meat mixture in a baking dish.

Bake at 350 for 45-50 minutes

Potatoes- For this try I cut Russet Potatoes into quarters and inserted them into the meatloaf mixture once it was put in the baking dish. I made sure to oil them with a little rubbing with olive oil. I covered the dish with tinfoil. I bake it in a 325 oven fro a bout 30 minutes then took the foil off. I could see the potatoes weren’t cooking so I turned the oven temperature up to 350. I bake the dish for about 1 hour and the meatloaf was done, but not the potatoes I gave it another 15 minutes then pulled it out. A couple of the potatoes were cooked soft enough to mash them with a fork; the rest of them weren’t done. I had baked a couple of sweet potatoes and a russet separaretly so I had plenty of potatoes for dinner and a problem to solve.

Here’s a couple ideas I’m going to try next time

  • Use different potatoes like Yukon Golds or small red potatoes, or maybe Sweet Potato.

  • Place the potatoes in a different place in the meatloaf pan

  • Definitely bake at a different temperature and play with tinfoil as needed

    ~

    Perfectly Cooked Baked Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes or Yams with Soft Skins

To me, it’s important to buy organic produce, especially if I’m going to eat the skins.

Place your washed sweet potato, yam or white potato on a piece of foil large enough to wrap completely cover and seal the potato. Rub liberally with a good oil. I used a organic avocado oil. Salt and pepper the potato to taste. Seal the potato and bake until soft. Potatoes can be cooked along side of a variety of dishes that cook at different temperatures between about 300 to 450 degrees. Obviously the higher the temperature the quicker they cook. Hot potato so carefully remove the foil. It’s ready to eat or you can add butter, sour cream and chives. Salsa is delicious on potatoes or maybe a scoop of chili?

Rub the potato with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper

Rub the potato with oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper

Wrap in foil.

Wrap in foil.

Perfectly cooked yams!

Perfectly cooked yams!

Densie Spayd - Siskiyou Food Assistance - Run for Food

Denise Spayd - Chicken, Pear & Gorgonzola Pasta

Denise with a map of the Run for Food map including the Bear Trail at COS.

Denise with a map of the Run for Food map including the Bear Trail at COS.

Denise Spayd is the Executive Director for the Siskiyou Food Assistance program (SFA). She started her career out as a nurse and still is, but taking some time for her family and her community. She is one of about 40 volunteers who work to bring food to those in need in South Siskiyou County.

The Siskiyou Food Assistance Run for Food a 5K Run/Walk takes place on Thanksgiving morning, November 22, 2018 at the COS Weed campus. Check in opens at 7:45am. The Run/Walk begins at 8:45am at the Football/Track Field.

Siskiyou County is considered a food desert; often ranking first in the western states. A food desert refers to lack of access to supermarkets. This generally refers to the difficulty in making a trip to a grocery store more difficult because of low rates of vehicle ownership and limited public transportation.

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Lauri: How did the Siskiyou Food Assistance program (SFA) get started?
Denise: The Siskiyou Food Assistance program began in 1986 when Pastor Jerry and Denise Broomfield helped striking mill workers with food from their little church in Weed. As they got older community members began pitching in year-round. We got a 501(c)3 and now annually serve about 700 clients and have about 40 volunteers including our staff and Board of Directors.

The program operates out of the old Weed Elementary School’s Arts & Theater and Home EC rooms, where my children once attended school. The school district gives us the space rent free, but we pay the power bill that can run as high as $500 in the winter months.

Volunteers set out the weeks donation of produce from General Produce.

Volunteers set out the weeks donation of produce from General Produce.

Lauri: How are people able participate in the food assistance program?
Denise: Anyone needing food assistance can come to the SFA food pantry located at 780 S. Davis Ave. We distribute the food boxes Wednesdays from 11am to 3pm. We require photo ID, proof of residence in South Siskiyou County, proof of income, household members, etc. then we create a file for them. Clients can receive up to ten Emergency Food Boxes annually and we have to track that for our funders.

Clients agree to volunteer 2 hours a year to help us with the work needed to keep the operations going. Volunteers work in the field where they can serve with their skills. We have everything from general paper work, data entry and managing the volumes of food that go through our program.

Salad dressing above and bulk grains below.

Salad dressing above and bulk grains below.

Fresh produce is donated to SFA by General Produce.

Fresh produce is donated to SFA by General Produce.

Lauri: How do clients receive the Emergency Food Box?
Denise: Once registered, clients come to the pantry on Wednesday and we check them in. They receive a list of the foods we have available and they select what they want. It’s a grocery list of what we have available on that day. Volunteers gather their items while the client selects from available produce. There is a pound limit on produce that can vary from 5 to 15 pounds depending on the donations from General Produce.

The Emergency Food Box is meant to supply a household with a three-day supply of nutritionally balanced staples and fresh food. We respect people’s dietary choices and needs. We offer as many vegetarian, vegan and organic options as are possible.

Lauri: Where does the food and money come from?
Denise: Grants, donations, food drives and fundraisers.SFA has many partnerships and diverse relationships that keep us in food. General Produce donates their #2 produce every week. That’s the produce that has flaws or isn’t good enough for the markets but is still good to eat. Grocery Outlet in Weed donates food that might be close to the expiration date. They also have an “Independence from Hunger” campaign in July. Ray’s Food Place has a similar drive through November & December called “Stuff the Truck.” In both of these store campaigns, shoppers can purchase bags of food to be donated to the local emergency food pantry.

The Siskiyou Community Food Bank in Yreka helps to provide food for all the area pantries. We occasionally combine orders with them to purchase from Feeding America in Contra Costa (Bay Area). A local trucker volunteers to bring back the load for a fuel stipend.

Great Northern Services provides food as they can. SFA distributes two commodities programs for GNS. They also are transporting produce for us on Wednesday mornings.

Belcampo Farms has donated eggs when their markets can’t absorb the quantities their hens are producing.

Fundraising campaigns that SFA conducts are the Run for Food 5k run/walk on Thanksgiving Day, and North State Giving Tuesday (held on the first Tuesday after Thanksgiving).

A client volunteering some of her time to do some data entry in SFA’s office at 780 S Davis Ave., Weed

A client volunteering some of her time to do some data entry in SFA’s office at 780 S Davis Ave., Weed

Siskiyou Food Assistance Pantry is stocking up for Thanksgiving Dinner Boxes.

Siskiyou Food Assistance Pantry is stocking up for Thanksgiving Dinner Boxes.

Lauri: One of your big programs are the Thanksgiving Boxes and what does it take to keep going?
Denise: It’s a real community effort where we honor the wishes of our founders. The Broomfield’s felt strongly that every family be blessed to celebrate the traditional holiday dinner in the comfort of their homes. We have been providing the box of fixings since 2001. This year we will make about 350 boxes. Each box costs us about $35. Partners include Grocery Outlet in Weed , Walmart in Yreka and local farms. We received a grant from the Ford Family Foundation and donations from Mercy Medical Center and Pilot Flying J Travel Centers.

Volunteers pack the boxes that are ready for pick up at the pantry. Anyone wanting a box should drive to our pantry well before 11am on November 19th. It is a first come, first served drive-up distribution. 

Zumba Instructor helping participants warm up so they can Run for Food. phot by Violet Carter

Zumba Instructor helping participants warm up so they can Run for Food. phot by Violet Carter

Lauri: How did the Run for Food come to be a fundraiser for SFA?
Denise: When I was still a board member, I saw the Run for Food in Chico. I found out the program could be duplicated by any community…so we did! We began the Weed Run for Food in 2011. It was fun and successful! We are now in our 8th year and it just gets better every year.

Lauri: Tell me more about what happens on Thanksgiving Day at the Run for Food?
Denise: We have a lot of different activities that make it fun for everyone. Every registered participant receives free raffle tickets. We try to get the very best of what this area has to offer for our raffle. Children aged 6-11 are free with participating adults. The first three finishers in each age group receive a medal. The top overall male and female finishers receive a special prize. A Zumba instructor gets the participants warmed-up before the run/walk begins. Refreshments are served at the finish line. There are stations throughout the race route to encourage runners and walkers. The route starts at the football field and circles around the COS campus on the Bear Trail returning to the football field.

The event logo is different each year. T-shirts are available with the current logo as a separate purchase at reasonable prices.

An amazing spirit of generosity and caring permeates the event. It’s something that can’t be manufactured. It’s from the hearts of all those volunteering there and attending. Join us!

For more information and to register link here:

https://www.raceplanner.com/register/index/weed-run-for-food-20

At the Run for Food finish line! photo by Violet Carter

At the Run for Food finish line! photo by Violet Carter

SFA reuses shopping bags

SFA reuses shopping bags

To make a donation for North State Giving Tuesday:

https://www.northstategives.org/nonprofits?keyword=Siskiyou+Food+Assistance

(donations can be scheduled beginning Nov. 13th, and processed on Nov. 27th)

 

Denise’s Favorite Recipe Chicken, Pear & Gorgonzola Pasta

Denise found her favorite recipe in the November 2011 issue of Enjoy magazine. It was submitted by Lana Granfors.

Serves 4

Prep & cooking time: 40 minutes

Ingredients

2 tbsp olive oil
4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
½ tsp salt
½ tsp white pepper
1 - 12 oz. package of dried spaghetti
2-4 soft-ripe Bosc pears (1 lb total)
1 tbsp lemon juice
1 cup (5oz) crumbled gorgonzola or other blue-veined cheese
½ cup chopped parsley
½ cup chicken broth
½ tsp cornstarch
2/3 cup roasted pecans
½ cup chopped green onions
Kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper

Preparation

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Rub chicken breasts with salt and white pepper. Place chicken breasts in the hot skillet, and cook for about 10 minutes on each side, until the juices run clear. Set aside and slice breasts crosswise, ½ inch thick just before combining pasta.

Using a 5-6-quart pan, cook spaghetti according to package directions or until just barely tender to bite, 7-9 minutes. Drain and return to pan.

While pasta and chicken are cooking, cut each pear lengthwise into eighths; core pieces, and slice them crosswise ¼ inch thick. In a bowl, gently mix the pear slices, lemon juice, gorgonzola and parsley; set aside.

In a 1-2-quart pan over high heat, stir broth and cornstarch until boiling. Gently mix into drained spaghetti along with the pear mixture and sliced chicken. Transfer to a serving dish. Scatter pecans and green onions on top, and season to taste with salt and pepper.

Nikolas Allen Real Estate Agent - Soft-Shell Street Tacos

Nikolas Allen Real Estate Agent

Nikolas found the perfect home for Artist Mimi Bailey and her family.  read my interview with Mimi here

Nikolas found the perfect home for Artist Mimi Bailey and her family. read my interview with Mimi here

I first met Nikolas Allen in Mount Shasta about 10 years ago. He has always been one of my favorite people with his big personality and creative energy. He was a helpful volunteer in the arts scene helping me hang shows at the old Arts Council's gallery. He also was the graphic designer creating postcards for numerous shows. Nikolas and I mentored high school students interested in poetry. He was one of the presenters when we produced The Business of the Arts, conducting a workshop on Marketing for Artists. He and his partner Brenda Eastman performed music at a fundraiser for the Siskiyou Arts Museum, He continues to work as the emcee for the Liberty Arts Fashion Show and Butteville Art Auction. Nikolas is the author of several books; Death To The Starving Artist - Art Marketing Strategies for a Killer Creative Career, and  Heavyweight Marketing - Knockout Strategies for Building Champion Brands. and now he is using all of his creative talents selling homes in Siskiyou County.

Visit The Bill Plate's Movies, Books and Songs about Food to see Nikolas' favorites

Lauri: How did you get interested in the real estate business? 
Nikolas: I'm a Realtor with J. Harris & Associates of Mt. Shasta, CA. Prior to getting into real estate, I enjoyed a 22-year career in marketing and advertising design. 

In 2015, I purchased my first home after decades of renting, and fell in love with the experience of home ownership. I was feeling a bit burnt out on marketing, so I got my real estate license in order to help other first-time homebuyers experience the same thrill. 

It was also helpful that my mother, Jessie Zapffe, was a broker in the agency I started with. She's a very successful agent, and has been quite inspirational. I never thought I would become a Realtor, but now that I'm in it, I love what I do, and can't imagine doing anything else. 

Another successful sale and now the Turtles have a new home!

Another successful sale and now the Turtles have a new home!

Lauri: I know you from your artwork and writings.  Do you still make time for your creative work?
Nikolas: I’ve pursued various creative avenues throughout my life, including music, filmmaking, writing, and fine art. And I've never been the type to "dabble," so I would dive deep into each pursuit, until it was time to move on to the next. Lately, I have been bitten by the music bug again, and am writing, recording, and performing songs again for the first time in years. Check out music by Nikolas Allen on Soundcloud. 

One cool thing about having this extensive creative background is that I can put all of the skills to use as a Realtor. When marketing myself, and my clients' properties, my use of design, music, video, and writing really helps me stand out from the rest of the pack.

celebrating their new home everyone takes the American Gothic pose for the camera

celebrating their new home everyone takes the American Gothic pose for the camera

Lauri: Did you go to school to do what you do?
Nikolas: I chose to play in rock bands after graduating high school, so I skipped out on the traditional 4-year college route. Eventually, I got an Associates degree in Advertising Design through a 2-year course at Brown Institute, which got my marketing career started. I also took a few college courses in music theory, and filmmaking to learn more about those topics. For real estate, I took an online course from Allied Schools, which helped me prepare for the exam. After six months of study and tests, I went to Sacramento and successfully pass the exam to get my license. 

However, with real estate, getting your license is only the first step. Your education really begins out in the field…and it never ends! There is always something more to learn about yourself, your clients, and the market in general. And when you enjoy learning and growing as a person as much as I do, that’s a great thing.

Lauri: Where do you get the inspiration to do what you do? Since now it's selling homes I'd image the rewards are both monetary and inspiring seeing people find their home sweet home. That’s got to be both fun and challenging.
Nikolas: I love helping people through the complex process of buying and selling their homes. There are some people who are super fun to work with as we move towards achieving their real estate goals. There is plenty of hard work, uncertainty, and struggle with every deal. The thrill that buyers and sellers feel when the deal closes successfully makes it all worthwhile! 

Some clients are more challenging, but that’s okay, too, because it offers lessons on patience, compassion, and communication. Becoming a Realtor has been the most fun, challenging, and rewarding career, both personally and financially, that I have experienced to date.

For market updates and real estate tips, connect with Nikolas online: 

Nikolas Allen on Instagram

Nikolas Allen on Facebook

Nikolas celebrating at their 2018 Sizzlin' Summer backyard party

Nikolas celebrating at their 2018 Sizzlin' Summer backyard party

Lauri: Any special summertime plans?
Nikolas: Summertime is where the real estate selling season really picks up. The market has seen a slower buildup this year than it has in the last couple years due to changing tax laws, rising prices, and increasing mortgage interest rates. However, activity finally started to bubble up in June, and though it got a later start than usual, I’m certain the busy season will continue strong through summer, fall, and even into the holidays.

On a personal front, my partner, Brenda Eastman, and I are heading to England for a 10-day vacation this fall, and we’re very excited to explore London and its surrounding areas. We may even begin our search for that perfect retirement cottage in the English countryside.

Brenda and Nikolas at their 2018 Sizzlin 'summer Backyard party!

Brenda and Nikolas at their 2018 Sizzlin 'summer Backyard party!

Lauri: What is your favorite part about sharing a meal friends and family?
Nikolas: I love the conversation and connection that happens around the table with friends and family. Brenda and I try to have one small dinner party every quarter. And at least one house or yard party per year. Plus, we’ll hit restaurants with friends or clients every month or two. There’s nothing quite like talking, laughing, relaxing, and catching up with friends and family over a leisurely meal to make you feel connected to the people who matter in your life.

Cheers! Toasting to the good food and great friends!

Cheers! Toasting to the good food and great friends!

Lauri: What is your favorite meal at a local restaurant?
Nikolas: Up until two years ago, I had been a vegan for 15 years, so my meals were pretty much limited to salads, veggie burgers, and other not-very-exciting options. Since I became a carnivore again, I’m on the ultimate search for great burgers, such as the ones found at Yaks in Dunsmuir. I also love Thai food from Andaman in Mt. Shasta, and Natalie Thai in Yreka. Mike & Tonys in Mt. Shasta has a great Chicken Picatta. In short, I’m having fun discovering all sorts of dishes that I haven’t been able to enjoy over the past 15 years. Oh, and if they serve a good red wine, all the better!

Lauri: What is your favorite meal at your favorite destination restaurant or road trip eatery?
Nikolas: I recently discovered View 202 in Redding, and was very pleased with their service, ambiance, and food (I had the Fish Tacos). Brickroom in Ashland, OR, is pretty amazing. Denny Bar Co. in Etna is a real boon to the area. The vision and execution of that place is on a higher level than anything in the county. I love road trips in general, and discovering hidden gem eateries along the way, even if that turns out to be a little greasy spoon in the middle of nowhere.

Soft-Shell Street Tacos

Soft-shell Street tacos - A variety of ingredients make this a meal that everyone can enjoy!

Soft-shell Street tacos - A variety of ingredients make this a meal that everyone can enjoy!

Nikolas Allen's Soft-Shell Street Tacos

One of my favorite meals to prepare at home is soft-shell street tacos because they are small in size, with minimal ingredients . It’s a fresh, healthy, and gluten-free meal that is tasty and easy to prepare. You can add a veggie side such as steamed broccoli, Brussel sprouts, or corn on the cob. Chips and salsa are optional, but always a fun addition.

Ingredients:  These can vary depending on what you’re in the mood for, but ours often look something like this...

Organic white corn tortillas (choose corn tortillas and chips if you’re aiming for gluten-free)
Fresh cabbage or lettuce
Cilantro - We grow it in our garden
Avocado
Black or green olives
Protein of choice (beef, chicken, fish)
Salsa
Spicy mustard
Avocado Oil Mayo

Preparation:

Cook your protein on stove or grill. Dice lettuce, cabbage, cilantro and slice olives, and avocado. Heat tortillas on stove or in the oven. Add light dab of mayo and squirt of spicy mustard on warmed tortilla. Assemble ingredients and top with salsa - Enjoy! 

Kim Solga - Artist - Turkey Chili

Kim in Alaska

Kim in Alaska

Kim Solga is an artist, muralist, and author. Kim’s landscape and floral watercolors can be seen at The Gallery in Mount Shasta and her website. Kim’s paintings are on display at the Mount Shasta branch of Scott Valley Bank (now Mechanics Bank) and in the homes of many Siskiyou County residents. Kim painted the mural on the side of the Dunsmuir City Hall. With a grant from the Shasta Regional Community Foundations she is painting  mural  on the Stream Wise building on the corner of Ida at 600 S. Mt. Shasta Blvd.  Kim's watercolors paintings are created primarily on location in remote wilderness location. She well known as a water colorist who captures rivers, waterfalls, glaciers, mountain scenes and plants.

June 23, 2018 Finished Mural, by Kim Solga

June 23, 2018 Finished Mural, by Kim Solga

Lauri: How long have you been an artist?
Kim: All my life! It all started when I was a child and I received some crayons. That is why I started KidsArt.com in 1986. I want kids to have access to art materials.  KidsArt is an online store selling a variety of art supplies including child-safe painting and drawing supplies to books on teaching art, and much more. KidsArt, also, prints and sells the popular KidsArt booklets, written by Kim

Kim Solga working on the Mount Shasta Mural with funding from the Shasta regional community foundation's arts in the community grant

Kim Solga working on the Mount Shasta Mural with funding from the Shasta regional community foundation's arts in the community grant

Lauri: Your paintings are primarily landscapes, but you create the sense of an intimate place where we can see the view you have selected to share with us. As the viewer I can imagine myself in the wilderness sitting on the rock where you are painting your artworks, Is that where the inspiration comes from, your intimate relationship to nature?
Kim: Yes, Look at where we live! I spend a lot of time river rafting, hiking, camping and climbing. We are on the water 30 to 50 days of the year. My partner and I have a Westy (Volkswagen Westfalia) we’ll go out camping just to be outdoors or to watch a meteor shower.

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Paints and sketches...tools of the trade.

Lauri: So now here you are painting a mural on the side of the Stream Wise building on the corner of Ida at 600 S. Mt. Shasta Blvd.
Kim: I received an Arts in Community grant from the Shasta Regional Community Foundation to paint this mural. It’s going to have a waterfall, bears and a couple of deer in it when it’s finished. I designed the background from a couple of watercolors I painted. It’ll take about 3 weeks to finish painting.

While this is a stylized abstract image of the mountain I want it to be as realistic as possible. I’d like for mountain climbers to be able to come here and identify climbing pathways. My hope it that this mural will serve as an instructional tool for climbers and mountain enthusiasts.

The Farm Bureau of Siskiyou County is currently fundraising for me to paint a mural on their building on 4th St. in Yreka. I'm looking forward to doing one I designed featuring 4-H farm kids and animals. (To see pictures and  more information link to this article in the Siskiyou Daily.

Left to Right Turkish Girl, Horse Camp Cabin, Matterhorn Climber, Spring Tulips 3  - Kim Solga watercolors

Lauri: I know you spend a lot of time on the road and the river. Where have you traveled?
Kim: From far south of the equator to the Arctic Circle. Last year we went to Africa. We’ve traveled to New Zealand, Baja, Alaska and Northern Canada. We’ve kayaked in many places in the United States including the Salmon in Idaho. We kayaked the both the sea and rivers of Alaska.  

Nest in Berry Vines - Kim Solga watercolor

Nest in Berry Vines - Kim Solga watercolor

We were in  the Gates of the Arctic National Park in northern  Alaska waiting for the weather to clear so a bush plane could pick us up. I was passing the time by tossing rocks into a pond...skipping stones…I picked up a stone and when I inspected it I realized it was projectile point with a broken tip. Here I was in a very remote part of the world with no roads in or out and find that someone has been here before me. I placed the point back down where I found it, following the principles to Leave No Trace.

Lauri's Rabbit Trail: One of the fun parts things about writing this blog is the rabbit trails I get to follow. I found this quirky video if you would like to learn more about The Seven Principles of Leave No Trace...then I went to the NPS.org and followed a link to an On-line Awareness Course that I spent about an hour taking and passing the test to receive a certificate in Lead No Trace. Have Fun!!

Solga's mural in progress june 20, 2018

Solga's mural in progress june 20, 2018

Lauri: What is your essential camp tool?
Kim: A good sleeping mattress, warm sleeping bag and a rain canopy that can be put up quickly. Comfort is all about the gear. When we go over to kayak the Kalmath with our families for 3-5 days we set up a gourmet kitchen, propane cook stove, lots of ice chests for food with plenty of Hors d'oeuvre and alcoholic beverages.

We’ve done the 3-4 week Grand Canyon Colorado River rafting trip many times. You just call up one of the outfitters who can plan your meals and load them into frozen ice chests that melt on appropriate days so you are eating fresh steaks on your 7th day in the canyon.They have it down. It is indeed painless travel. 

 These are a sampling of Solga's watercolors of the Grand Canyon visit her website to see more and read her story. Solga.com From left to right: Saddle Canyon, Deer Creek Falls, Havasu and 164 Mile Rapids

kim solga mural at S. mt. shasta blvd. & ida  in progress june 6, 2018

kim solga mural at S. mt. shasta blvd. & ida  in progress june 6, 2018

Lauri: Do you have a favorite eatery in the county?
Kim: We were coming off the Klamath River with 30 hungry river rafters. We stopped in a Natalee Thai Cuisine  1225 S. Main St. in Yreka at 6:30pm on a Saturday night. They found us seats, gave us our food very quickly, wrote separate checks and did it all with grace and a smile! I split the Tom Kha Soup that came out of the kitchen with a fire under it. It was filling and delicious!

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River Rafter's Turkey Chili for 16

This recipe can be cut in half or divided by 4 if you are planning on feeding a hungry crowd of river rafters.

Ingredients:

6 garlic cloves
2 onions
4 lbs. ground turkey
3 standard cans northern beans
2 standard cans pintos
1 chicken bouillon cube
2 large cans whole green chilis (dice them, maybe buy diced) (30 oz)
1 large can hominy (30 oz)
2 standard cans corn
chili powder to taste (2 tsp or more)
cumin to taste (2 tsp or more)
salt and pepper to taste
4 limes
1 lb. jack cheese
sour cream
hot sauce
fresh cilantro

Directions:

Saute meat, onions, garlic, add cans, spices (chili powder, cumin), water to desired soupiness.

Garnish w/ sour cream, grated cheese, lime, hot sauce.

Kim's Tips: This freezes well and also make a good first night meal when "on the river." You can also make this a day before serving, as it benefits from "resting."

If you make this at home you can use fresh rather than the canned foods we have to pack for the river.

Turkey Chili served with a cornmeal muffin and garden salad. 

Turkey Chili served with a cornmeal muffin and garden salad.